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Tag Archives: Regent Street

Regent Street Christmas Lights

Regent Street, London
08 December 2012

Regent Street Christmas Lights

Regent Street Christmas Lights

 
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Posted by on January 10, 2013 in photoblog

 

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Regent Street and the Royal Wedding

Regent Street, London
23 April 2011

I was at Regent Street yesterday; it’s been done up nicely for the Royal Wedding (at least, that’s what I think the flags are for).

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2011 in photoblog

 

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Day 120: Regent Street (3)

Regent Street (3)

 

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Day 118: Regent Street (2)

Regent Street (2)

Regent Street is an example of Beaux Arts ‘façadism’, an architectural set piece designed to impress as it unfurls before the visitor. It is a medley of related styles and decoration, with each building having been designed individually but within strict guidelines. Each block was required to be designed with a continuing unifying façade to the street, regardless of the number of sub-divisions behind the main elevation, and they had to be finished in Portland stone with a uniform cornice level.

All the buildings in Regent Street are listed as being at least Grade II status and together they form the Regent Street Conservation Area.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regent_Street

 

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Day 62: Regent Street

Regent Street

This is Regent Street as seen from Piccadilly Circus.

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Regent Street is a major shopping street and thoroughfare in London’s West End. Prince Regent (later George IV), it was built by John Nash.

The street still belongs to The Crown Estate, which keeps its offices adjacent to the street.

Nash planned a wide boulevard with a sweeping curve. The optimum use of pockets of Crown Estate land meant that the New Street (as Regent Street was initially known) contained a number of twists; where Portland Place joins Langham Place, and where the street enters Piccadilly Circus. The street was completed in 1825 and was an early example of town planning in England: until this point, London had grown somewhat randomly. Nash saw New Street as a clear dividing line between Soho, which was considered less than respectable, and the fashionable squares and streets of Mayfair.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regent_Street

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2008 in photoblog, Project 365

 

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